Ain’t nothin but a high tide. EP tracking for early 2015… (at Stagg Street Studio)

Ain’t nothin but a high tide. EP tracking for early 2015… (at Stagg Street Studio)

Even Fridays sound good through a #pultec / #tubetech. (Sorry for clogging your feeds with gear and coffee)

Even Fridays sound good through a #pultec / #tubetech. (Sorry for clogging your feeds with gear and coffee)

good to see you, san francisco.  (at Hyde Street Studios)

good to see you, san francisco. (at Hyde Street Studios)

Labor Day was fun.

Labor Day was fun.

ain’t nothing but a high tide

ain’t nothing but a high tide

#matchless cab joined the family today. sorry for only posting gear and coffee you guys.

#matchless cab joined the family today. sorry for only posting gear and coffee you guys.

my tiny cabin in the hills above San Luis Obispo.

my tiny cabin in the hills above San Luis Obispo.

Recording “The Bells”

While the the soon-to-be record began taking shape I found my writing had taken some sharp turns. On one hand I found myself writing more ballads- songs that I would have never brought to a previous band, on the other I was picking up the electric guitar more and embracing a more forward rock and roll style.

Six-string in hand, “The Bells" was born - a trip into paranoia, obsession and memory. I can remember the sounds of many church, mosque and city bells around the world and they became a device in this song, endless and replaying in my mind.

Once the demo was mulled over it was time to call in the wrecking crew and we turned our friends loose to give “The Bells” some attitude. Miles McPherson’s drums were tight in the verses and increasingly frantic in the choruses. Tony Franklin, who played the fretless bass on “When I Saw Your Ghost” cut the bass on this one as well. If you listen close you can hear he only “sounds” fretless when he wants to, and the bass slithers and growls around before driving the choruses. A foundation to live up to, indeed.

In order to keep the song explosive there was great effort made to keep sections contrasting and slowly building as the song progressed. The electric guitars mainly stay in the choruses, leaving the verses open with some jangly acoustic and some synths. Some of Bruce Kulick’s old Les Pauls, including a gold top with P90s I particularly loved, made this track, and in the amp department I believe we used his vintage Bassman and an old trusty Marshall. Tones were fairly dry and crunchy, bookends to the old warbly analog synth (my Yamaha DX7), except for the “new wave-y” clean guitar in the choruses which we compressed and lathered in ambience.

Time to sing. Engineer/mixer Jorge Velasco, a guiding force on the album as a whole, drove the bus on this song as we began vocals. We spent a summer afternoon in North Hollywood knocking out the vocals for “The Bells” and it remains one of my favorites on the entire record. When we got to the chorus vocals all I remember is just breathing deep and going for it- thankfully, the notes came out. Having the bridge chant continue to the end over the chorus like a round was an idea that I had sketched out in my original demos but Jorge and (producer) Jeremy Rubolino brought it all to life as we chanted and sang the background parts over and over. If you can zoom in enough to the vocal booth picture below you can see my numbered tracking lyric sheet.

It was a portly finished session file, mostly filled with vocal tracks, that was handed over to Brian Virtue to mix and his first pass hit the nail on the head. So, “The Bells” was a wrap and added to the ‘finished’ stack. Give it a listen or two, perhaps in headphones- you may hear something new each time.

On iTunes: http://smarturl.it/hardlight

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this week’s read: Laurel Canyon by Michael Walker. have you ever felt 50 years late to a party?

this week’s read: Laurel Canyon by Michael Walker. have you ever felt 50 years late to a party?

time for a change- goodbye AC15, hello ultimate Craigslist score. #gearnerd

time for a change- goodbye AC15, hello ultimate Craigslist score. #gearnerd